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Macaroni Sans

Designed by Russell Bean, Macaroni Sans is a sans serif and typewriter font family. This typeface has seventeen styles and was published by Type Associates.

Macaroni Sans was conceived out of a need for an extended font family consisting of a range of weights in both uprights and obliques, with a contemporary appeal.
The desired character was to be sympathetic with a range of high-tech consumer products.
Thus a friendly, soft approach was called for.
The resulting mix of geometric shape, rounded terminals, subtle italic angle of just six degrees and a few quirky stroke endings met with an enthusiastic response.
As its intended product line exudes brilliant color and imagery, a style that conveyed contemporary appeal and readability but would not compete with the savvy products.

Macaroni Sans was conceived out of a need for an extended font family consisting of a range of weights in both uprights and obliques, with a contemporary appeal. The desired character was to be sympathetic with a range of high-tech consumer products. Thus a friendly, soft approach was called for. The resulting mix of geometric shape, rounded terminals, subtle italic angle of just six degrees and a few quirky stroke endings met with an enthusiastic response. As its intended product line exudes brilliant color and imagery, a style that conveyed contemporary appeal and readability but would not compete with the savvy products.

We arrived at a clean, modern, sociable look that would suit a broad subject field in either text, semi display or signage. Its simple lines and monoline strokes fit well with logo usage or screaming posters, enhancing letterheads or websites, for foodstuffs to autos, insurance to swimming pools, lawfirms to babyfood. Macaroni Sans is the perfect typeface for branding, logotypes, may even flatter challenging viewing conditions.

Rounded types have been around (pardon the pun) for centuries, numerous examples can be seen on old wood type posters, which in a small way prompted the name: in fashion Macaroni was a term used in mid-eighteenth century Europe to describe a dandy, a chap who displayed flamboyance in dress and hairstyle and spoke outlandishly or in an effeminate manner. Hence the term macaronic verse.

Foundry Type Associates
Fonts 17
Price $30.00
Released 2015
Styles Sans Serif, Typewriter
Designer Russell Bean

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